Black, White, & Read All Over

becauseoftolkien:

He helped me realize that even if the world is infinitely bigger than you are, you are still capable of changing it.
Submitted by Anonymous

becauseoftolkien:

He helped me realize that even if the world is infinitely bigger than you are, you are still capable of changing it.

Submitted by Anonymous

(via toralinda)

thescienceofrealities:

English language did you knows.

  • Did you know the most commonly used letter in the alphabet is E
  • Did you know the least used letter in the alphabet is Q
  • Did you know skiing is the only word with double i
  • Did you know dreamt is the only word that ends in mt
  • Did you know the first letters of the months July through to November spell JASON
  • Did you know there are only 4 words in the English language which end in ‘dous’ (they are: hazardous, horrendous, stupendous and tremendous)
  • Did you know the oldest word in the English language is ‘town’
  • Did you know 'Bookkeeper' and 'bookkeeping' are the only 2 words in the English language with three consecutive double letters
  • Did you know the word ‘Strengths’ is the longest word in the English language with just one vowel
  • Did you know the dot on top of the letter ‘i’ is called a tittle
  • Did you know the past tense for the English word ‘dare’ is ‘durst’
  • Did you know the word ‘testify’ derived from a time when men were required to swear on their testicles
  • Did you know the first English dictionary was written in 1755
  • Did you know the word old English word ‘juke’ meaning dancing lends its name to the juke box
  • Did you know 1 out of every 8 letters written is an e
  • Did you know the longest one syllable word in the English language is ‘screeched’
  • Did you know all pilots on international flights identify themselves in English regardless of their country of origin
  • Did you know the expression to ‘knuckle down’ originated from playing marbles (players used to put their knuckles to the ground for their best shots)
  • Did you know the word ‘almost’ is the longest in the English language with all the letters in alphabetical order
  • Did you know the most commonly used word in English conversation is ‘I’  

(Source: thescienceofreality)

“Bibliomaniac: A victim of the obsessive-compulsive neurosis characterized by a congested library and an atrophied bank account.”
— Maurice Dunbar (via hellyeahbooks)

(via teachingliteracy)

“Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new.”
— Albert Einstein (via physicsisdead)

(Source: eugeniqs)

“The joy of bourbon drinking is not the pharmacological effect of the C2H5OH on the cortex but rather the instant of the whiskey being knocked back and the little explosion of Kentucky U.S.A. sunshine in the cavity of the nasopharynx and the hot bosky bite of Tennessee summertime —aesthetic considerations to which the effect of the alcohol is, if not dispensable, at least secondary.”

Walker Percy in “Bourbon, Neat,” quoted by Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. Since I first read this essay, when I was perhaps fourteen or fifteen years old, I have remembered that invaluable phrase precisely and used it on occasion: “hot bosky bite.”

For some time, I supposed —stupidly— that Percy had simply invented the word “bosky” in an effort to capture the way bourbon tastes and feels: two syllables, because it is a matter-of-fact sort of flavor, concise even when complex. But of course “bosky” is a real word, with a definition: “Having abundant bushes, shrubs, or trees.”

Good God! If you’ve ever been in a hot Southern state in the summer, out away from the roads and houses, in fields or little glades surrounded by plain, unprepossessing woods, and if you’ve tasted bourbon, you must recognize that this is inspired, precise lyricism; it is the result of brilliant observation and masterful, unaffected diction. The flatness of bland blue skies which cling close to buzzing, sun-bleached, lush yet crackling lands, the simultaneity of heat and verdancy: this is the best metaphor I know for the flavor of bourbon, which, I regret, is irreplaceable if one gives up drinking.

Note also the two forms of prose: the specialized vocabulary of the scientist as a foil to the poetics of the the real point, the evocation of place and season and atmosphere. The sort of lexical pyrotechnics for which many esteem David Foster Wallace predates him, of course, although in “Oblivion” I believe he brought it to an apotheosis of sorts (an anti-apotheosis: the dull triumph of inhumanly technical language). But it is worth noting because Wallace’s real gifts, like Percy’s, have nothing to do with the niftiness of his interdisciplinary sentences; that is a matter of style, a style which either supports higher artistic aims or is lazy mannerism, as most writing in fact is.

(via mills)

(via scienceishertruelove)